Free Grants

A Grant is money that does not have to be repaid, provided it is used for the intended purpose as designated by the Grantor. Most Grants are provided by Government - the Federal, State or Local governments and the most popular are the Federal Pell Grant and the Smart Grant. To qualify for these two Grants, you must -

  1. Fill out the FAFSA -(Free Application for Federal Financial Aid) this form is also used in other government financial aid programs.
  2. Legal Status - To be considered for federal financial aid, you must either be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen. Eligible non-citizens are U.S. nationals and aliens who have I-151, I-551 and I-551C Permanent Resident Cards. You must also have a valid Social Security Number.
  3. Education - You need a High School Diploma or a GED or have completed a minimum of six credit hours of study towards earning a qualifying post secondary certificate or degree.
  4. Enrollment - You must be enrolled in an accredited College or University.

If you are delinquent on any government student loans, you will not qualify for more financial aid. You can only receive government grants after you are accepted for enrollment. Grant amounts are determined by the number of credits you are taking. Full time students receive more money than part-time.

PELL Grants

The FAFSA is intrinsically an application for the Pell Grant, which is the basic government grant that post-secondary students in the United States receive. Therefore, once you fill out the FAFSA, you will automatically be considered for the Pell Grant. As of the 2011-12 school year, the maximum amount an individual may receive in Pell Grant funds is $5,500. According to, "The amount depends on your financial need, costs to attend school, status as a full-time or part-time student and plans to attend school for a full academic year or less."

Satisfactory Academic Progress: In order to continue qualifying for the Pell Grant, you must exhibit satisfactory academic progress toward earning your degree or certificate. If you fail too many classes, you may be disqualified for future grants on academic grounds. The specific requirements for academic progress are set by your school. To ensure that you remain in good standing, study diligently and do not fail your classes. If you are disqualified from receiving government grants due to poor performance but continue with your studies anyway, an improvement in performance can help you to receive grants again in the future.

Use of Funds: Part of the FAFSA form is a personal statement in which the applicant must agree to use grant funds to address expenses related to education, such as tuition, school fees, books, etc. In most cases, Pell Grant funds can be used to pay for things like food and rent as well.

Financial Need: One of the requirements for receiving a Pell Grant is that you must exhibit significant financial need. The following items are key aspects of this assessment:

Household Status

  • marital status
  • number of dependents
  • number of family members attending qualifying educational institutions


  • personal income
  • spouse's income
  • parents' income


  • personal assets
  • spouse's assets
  • parents' assets


The SMART Grant is a federal grant program that the Department of Education offers in addition to the Pell Grant. Unlike the Pell Grant, which is mostly need-based, the SMART Grant is based on academic performance and on the student's course of study. Qualifying courses of study include various science, technology, engineering, mathematics and critical foreign languages. To receive SMART Grant funds, students must be enrolled in a qualifying course of study at an accredited university and must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. As of the 2011-12 academic year, students may receive up to $4,000 in grants from this program during their third and fourth academic years.

Federal Grant Disbursement

If the federal government decides that you are eligible to receive a federal grant, it does not send you the money directly. Rather, the government sends the money to your school which may either automatically apply it to what you owe for tuition, fees, etc. or give the money straight to you.

State Grant Programs

In addition to the grant programs offered by the federal government, States also offer funds to help students pay for university educations. The specific requirements and funding methods of these programs differ from State to State and program to program. However, most of them use the FAFSA as a starting point and look at whether or not you have already received federal grants.

If you are starting to plan for your or your child's college education, you should take a look at both the Pell and SMART grants. Additionally, you should take a look at your State's website for State specific grants. Doing your homework ahead of time will help you to make the cost of college education more manageable for you and your family.


  • - The National Science & Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant
  • - Student Aid Eligibility
  • – Federal Pell Grant


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